BIBLIOTHECA Crossfire Christian Marclay(TW922)

Artist : Christian Marclay
Publisher : White Cube

アメリカ人ミュージシャン、アーティストのクリスチャン・マークレー(Christian Marclay)による作品集。本書は、ロンドンのギャラリー「White Cube」での個展開催に伴い刊行された。

作者は1980年代初期から音とイメージの関係性を探求するユニークな作品を発展させてきた。生き生きとした生命力と知性を感じさせるコラージュで知られ、レコードカバーから映画の場面まで、ありとあらゆる素材を使って絵画、オブジェ、インスタレーションを制作してきた。

展覧されていたビデオインスタレーション『Crossfire』では、銃と銃撃のカットが矢継ぎ早に映し出されるモンタージュを4つの巨大なスクリーンに投影し、鑑賞者を取り囲むことにより身体感覚を刺激する空間を作り出している。遠くの国の戦争や地元の犯罪についてのニュースに常に登場し、映画においては物語を語る道具という役割を長らく果たしてきた銃は、メディアで使われるイメージの中でも最も象徴的なものだろう。銃は常に暴力を想起させるが、その一方で外部の脅威から守ってくれるという偽りの安心を与える。

本作で探求されているのは、恐怖と魅惑という双子のような感覚だ。上着をめくってホルスターに収められたごついハンドガンを見せる男、冷たい鉄の銃身を性愛の対象であるかのように撫でる指、リボルバーのシリンダーに弾丸を押しこむ親指など、小さなピストルから猛々しいライフルまで、『Crossfire』の登場人物は様々な銃を扱う。やがて銃撃戦が始まり、魅惑に満ちたリズムに合わせて激しくなったり弱まったりしながら脈打つ暴力が鑑賞者を飲みこむ。休むことなく攻撃し続ける銃の音が次第に打楽器のように聞こえてくるように、正確に配置された音とイメージ。作者は、西部劇やギャング映画、戦争映画という素材から奇妙な音楽を引き出してみせるのだ。

From Exhibition information:
Since the early 1980s, Marclay has been developing a distinctive body of work that explores the relationships between sound and image. Renowned for his exuberant and witty collages, Marclay has made use of everything from record covers to film clips to construct pictures, objects and installations.

The video installation 'Crossfire' creates a charged, physical space in which the viewer is surrounded by four large projections playing a rapid montage of guns and gunfire. The gun is perhaps the most iconic image in the media, a constant presence in everything from newscasts about faraway wars and local crimes to its persistent role as a narrative device in movies. While guns always foreshadow violence, they also offer a false promise of safety from an outside threat. Marclay plays with this twin sense of dread and fascination. 'Crossfire' features characters handling a variety of guns, from small pistols to unruly rifles – a man pulls back his jacket to reveal a thick handgun in a holster, fingers caress a steely gun barrel as if stroking a fetish object, a thumb pushes bullets into the cylinder of a revolver. When the shooting begins, the viewer is engulfed by a cadenced, pulsating violence that diminishes and intensifies with mesmerising rhythm. Although the viewer is under a continuous assault, Marclay’s precise arrangement of sound and image allows the gunfire to become a kind of percussion instrument, and Crossfire coaxes a strange music from the Westerns, gangster flicks and war movies that the artist has used as raw material.